Modern Approaches to Indoor Plants

modern-approaches-to-indoor-plantsThe rise in popularity of mid-century modern furniture has made interior decorating the job of a true minimalist, which is why, in addition to the anxiety you might feel about hosting a living decoration in your home, many have given up on the concept of plants in their space. Adding too many plants, especially in small, low pots, can absolutely cause a cluttered effect, but some types of plants can provide the warmth and natural vibe that some of you might be craving without compromising all of your de-cluttering efforts. I know what you’re thinking, “but I don’t have a green thumb!” I’m not advocating for fake plants here, but I do know of some types that are low maintenance and provide some excellent advantages to your space.

aloe plantThe aloe plant is a great start! Secreting a healing gel, the aloe can be harvested to aid your skin and digestive system. It needs minimal water (once every seven days give or take depending on its environment) being apart of the recently popular succulent family, and it loves the sun! Have an east-facing window? The aloe plant could be for you.

 

 

Snake PlantThe Snake plant is another great, low maintenance choice. Architecturally it grows tall and spiky which makes it perfect for empty corners and extreme vertical spaces. It needs little water and even less light AND it releases an abundance of nocturnal oxygen (most plants release oxygen during the day) making it a great addition for detoxifying your home round the clock.

Just remember to place your plants strategically, keeping in mind their relationship to all objects in a given space as well as their particular needs (sun, shade, dry, wet).

 

Frank Lloyd Wright, What is History and What is Contemporary

Last week I talked about Craftsman architecture, specifically, the characteristics of Prairie style. I figure, since I’m on a role, I should write a little about Frank Lloyd Wright. He was, after all, integral to the movement and the overall establishment of the aesthetic.

A masterful architectural designer, Wright developed a unique vocabulary of space, form, and patternhollyhockhouse-wright that represented a dramatic shift in design from the traditional houses of the day. Characterized by dramatic horizontal lines and masses, the Prairie buildings that emerged in the first decade of the twentieth century evoke the expansive Midwestern landscape. The buildings reflect an all-encompassing philosophy that Wright termed “Organic Architecture.” By this Wright meant that architecture should be suited to its environment and be a product of its place, purpose and time. First developed in 1894, when Wright was establishing his practice in Chicago, this philosophy of design would inform his entire career.

Today, Wright’s name is heavily associated with the movement away from ornate European styles and has become symbolic of classic American architecture. Most recently, Wright’s Holly Hock house, located on a majestic hilltop in Los Feliz, CA, was re-opened after undergoing nearly five years of restoration and repairs. You can go check it out for yourself or take an online tour of its stunning interiors!